THE PLAN Journal (TPJ) intends to disseminate and promote innovative, thought-provoking and relevant research, studies and criticism in architecture and urbanism. The criteria for selecting contributions will be innovation, clarity of purpose and method, and potential transformational impact on disciplinary fields or the broader socio-cultural context. The ultimate purpose of the TPJ is to enrich the dialog between research and professional fields, in order to encourage both applicable new knowledge and intellectually driven modes of practice. (Maurizio Sabini)

LATEST ARTICLES

 Open Access
THEORY
Conference Report

"Ando and Le Corbusier: Masters of Architecture" Symposium

by: Eric Mumford VOLUME 4/2019 - Issue 1 , Pages: 1 - 4 doi: doi: 10.15274/tpj.2019.04.01.4, published: 2019-03-04
 Open Access
THEORY
Book Review

"Lake of the Mind. A Conversation with Steven Holl"

by: Christopher Platt VOLUME 4/2019 - Issue 1 , Pages: 1 - 5 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2019.04.01.5, published: 2019-03-05
 Subscribers only
HOUSING
Article

Housing by People and Work: Design Principles for Favelas Residents in Economies of Commerce and Service

by: Ana Rosa Chagas Cavalcanti , Tiziano Li Piani VOLUME 4/2019 - Issue 1 , Pages: 1 - 24 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2019.04.01.3, published: 2019-03-04

This article proposes a new approach towards the design and planning of social housing destined to residents living in informal settlements of Brazil. It is aimed at restoring the proximity between the labor and domestic functions within the spatial domain of the house. This need emerges from a field research aimed at addressing the spatial logics emplaced by residents in Brazilian favelas. The integration proposed in the article is meant to be achieved with the combined goal of improving the living conditions of the residents, sustaining also their socio-economic development, while promoting also the economy of the city. Graphic guidelines are shown to the reader after a critical analysis of the main systems of housing currently emplaced for unprivileged people. 

 Open Access
THEORY
In Memoriam

Remembering Robert Venturi, a Modern Mannerist

by: Maurizio Sabini VOLUME 4/2019 - Issue 1 , Pages: 1 - 7 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2019.04.01.1, published: 2018-10-05

 Open Access
CRITICISM
Exhibition Review

"FREESPACE" and the Citizen: Stories of Generosity from the Venice Architecture Biennale 2018

by: Carla Brisotto , Cristina Cassandra Murphy , Martha Battaglin Ramos VOLUME 4/2019 - Issue 1 , Pages: 9 - 24 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2019.04.01.2, published: 2018-10-30

 Open Access
Editorial

New Paradigms

by: Maurizio Sabini VOLUME 3/2018 - Issue 2 [THE SHARED PROJECT], Pages: 269 - 271 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2018.03.02.11, published: 2019-02-13
 Subscribers only
Article

Collective Creativity in a Geodesign World: The DC-Baltimore Futures Studio

by: Jana VanderGoot , Dan Engelberg , Gerrit-Jan Knaap VOLUME 3/2018 - Issue 2 [THE SHARED PROJECT], Pages: 377 - 400 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2018.03.02.9, published: 2019-02-12

In the spring of 2018, the National Center for Smart Growth (NCSG) invited architects at the University of Maryland to engage a project called PRESTO (Prospects for Regional Sustainability Tomorrow). PRESTO is believed to be the first attempt at addressing the long-term sustainability of the DC-Baltimore region using advanced algorithmic modeling and scenario analysis techniques to examine the impacts of fuel costs, technological advancement, and government regulation. This article highlights contributions of the DC-Baltimore Futures: Designing XL to XS studio as it engaged the multi-disciplinary NCGS team on PRESTO, which is described in this article as a geodesign project. The impact of collective creativity as part of DC-Baltimore Futures studio pedagogy is discussed as one of the many ways that the PRESTO algorithms were tested. The article concludes with reflections on the role and potential of collective creativity in open source modes of geodesign and “senseable” city design.

 Subscribers only
Essay

Fluid Urbanism: How Information Steered Architecture Might Reshape the Dynamics of Civic Dwelling

by: Sharon Wohl , Reny Revariah VOLUME 3/2018 - Issue 2 [THE SHARED PROJECT], Pages: 401 - 426 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2018.03.02.8, published: 2018-12-20

This paper speculates on how new forms of dwelling might be re-conceived as more nimble, flexible components: ones capable of deploying to different sites and atmospheres, while simultaneously providing more broadly distributed access to amenities that otherwise remain limited to the privileged few. Specifically, it examines the notion of a mobile dwelling architecture that could be deployed to various sites across the city - each site being characterized by particular “niche” offerings. Here, rather than dwelling units being considered as static entities within the urban fabric, they are re-considered as nimble, deployable agents - able to relocate to different sites and settings in accordance with different parameters that are customized through individual cost-benefit analyses and feedback dynamics. Accordingly, over time, bottom-up, self-organizing “niches” of fit inhabitation emerge. The paper associates this kind of designed environment with the dynamics of complex adaptive systems - where emergent global features arise from the bottom-up. Here, a kind of “swarm” urbanism is deployed: one adjusting over time in response to atmospheric variables.

 Open Access
EDITORIAL
Article

In This Issue [1/2018]

by: Maurizio Sabini VOLUME 3/2018 - Issue 1 , Pages: 5 - 6 doi: doi: 10.15274/tpj.2018.03.01.14, published: 2018-08-02

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