THE PLAN Journal (TPJ) intends to disseminate and promote innovative, thought-provoking and relevant research, studies and criticism in architecture and urbanism. The criteria for selecting contributions will be innovation, clarity of purpose and method, and potential transformational impact on disciplinary fields or the broader socio-cultural context. The ultimate purpose of the TPJ is to enrich the dialog between research and professional fields, in order to encourage both applicable new knowledge and intellectually driven modes of practice. (Maurizio Sabini)

Latest Articles

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SUSTAINABILITY
Article

Landscape Lifecycles as a Speculative Design Research Practice for Transforming Waste Conditions

by: Catherine De Almeida VOLUME 5/2020 - Issue 1 , Pages: 185 - 220 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2020.05.01.9, published: 2020-06-23

Research-based design has been foundational for landscape architecture. Analytical layering in geographically-based mappings has become a universally applied, formulaic approach. For waste landscapes, this has generated similar redevelopment strategies for drastically differing waste landscape conditions. This site typology, however, requires more nuanced approaches. As a design-research framework, “landscape lifecycles” aims to tackle waste landscapes with integrative strategies and techniques that reactivate waste as a legible and dynamic contributor to local and regional contexts; a method for integrating multiple diverse programs rooted in economic, environmental, and social performance to form hybrid assemblages in the transformation of perceived material and spatial waste. This article highlights design-research and generative representational methods developed through projects and coursework that embrace speculation as a means of engaging with waste conditions at multiple scales — from the material to the region. These methods range from speculative geographic, process, and abstract mapping to scenario testing to time-based, projective design that document, explore, and test an argumentative hypothesis and the multi-scalar design implications of research on the imaginative potentials of waste transformation.

 Open Access
THEORY
Essay

American Mirror: the Occupation of the ‘New World’ and the Rise of Architecture as We Know It

by: Fernando Luiz Lara VOLUME 5/2020 - Issue 1 , Pages: 71 - 88 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2020.05.01.5, published: 2020-05-18

This paper argues that the rise of architecture as a unique discipline and the conquest of the American continent are not just chronological coincidences but interdependent variables of the same process of modernization. Traditional scholarship in architecture has not entertained those parallel developments at all. The field of architectural history and theory still treats the spatial occupation of the Americas as a consequence of the Renaissance and European modernization, despite a few decades of scholarly literature in related disciplines questioning such assumptions. (Fanon 1961; Said 1978; Dussel 1980; Bhabha 1987;  Escobar 1994). Such scholarship demonstrates that the encounter of 1492 and the territorial occupation that followed played a central role in the development of Western culture in general, allowing the extrapolation of the same logic to the architectural discipline in particular. 

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CROSS-DISCIPLINARY STUDIES
Article

Architectural Portraits: ῾The MIES Project’

by: Arina Dähnick VOLUME 5/2020 - Issue 1 , Pages: 9 - 30 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2020.05.01.4, published: 2020-05-14

This article wants to offer a brief overview of my experience as an architectural photographer and of “The Mies Project” in particular, on which I have been working on for the past few years. My approach to photography, based on the latest digital technology but also on the Leica M-System, is briefly outlined. In the past, the question was how to obtain information. Nowadays, the proper structuring of information is what really matters. Architectural Portraits, a small selection of which from “The Mies Project” are here presented, are “intimate gazes,” prioritizing the relationship of the detail of a building with its surrounding, the interaction between construction details, lighting and weather conditions. In this sense, Mies’ works not only have sparked my interest in architectural photography, but have been also the perfect poetic partner for my research.

 Open Access
CRITICISM
Book Review

Aldo Rossi: Representing Life

by: Raffaella Neri VOLUME 5/2020 - Issue 1 , Pages: 253 - 259 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2020.05.01.3, published: 2020-05-11


 

Aldo Rossi and the Spirit of Architecture

By Diane Y. F. Ghirardo

London: Yale University Press

254 mm x 203 mm

135 color + 5 b/w illustrations

280 pages

US$65 / £50.00 GBP (hardback)

ISBN: 978-0300234930

 

 Open Access
CRITICISM
Conference Report

Giancarlo De Carlo. A Symposium

by: Sara Marini , Marko Pogacnik VOLUME 5/2020 - Issue 1 , Pages: 261 - 278 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2020.05.01.2, published: 2020-05-11

Featured Articles

 Open Access
THEORY
Essay

American Mirror: the Occupation of the ‘New World’ and the Rise of Architecture as We Know It

by: Fernando Luiz Lara VOLUME 5/2020 - Issue 1 , Pages: 71 - 88 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2020.05.01.5, published: 2020-05-18

This paper argues that the rise of architecture as a unique discipline and the conquest of the American continent are not just chronological coincidences but interdependent variables of the same process of modernization. Traditional scholarship in architecture has not entertained those parallel developments at all. The field of architectural history and theory still treats the spatial occupation of the Americas as a consequence of the Renaissance and European modernization, despite a few decades of scholarly literature in related disciplines questioning such assumptions. (Fanon 1961; Said 1978; Dussel 1980; Bhabha 1987;  Escobar 1994). Such scholarship demonstrates that the encounter of 1492 and the territorial occupation that followed played a central role in the development of Western culture in general, allowing the extrapolation of the same logic to the architectural discipline in particular. 

 Subscribers only
CROSS-DISCIPLINARY STUDIES
Article

Architectural Portraits: ῾The MIES Project’

by: Arina Dähnick VOLUME 5/2020 - Issue 1 , Pages: 9 - 30 doi: 10.15274/tpj.2020.05.01.4, published: 2020-05-14

This article wants to offer a brief overview of my experience as an architectural photographer and of “The Mies Project” in particular, on which I have been working on for the past few years. My approach to photography, based on the latest digital technology but also on the Leica M-System, is briefly outlined. In the past, the question was how to obtain information. Nowadays, the proper structuring of information is what really matters. Architectural Portraits, a small selection of which from “The Mies Project” are here presented, are “intimate gazes,” prioritizing the relationship of the detail of a building with its surrounding, the interaction between construction details, lighting and weather conditions. In this sense, Mies’ works not only have sparked my interest in architectural photography, but have been also the perfect poetic partner for my research.

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